Tag Archives: identification

Fungiilicious

27 Sep

I went on a big walk to Ojibway Nature Reserve Park this morning and couldn’t help snapping of almost 100 more photos of fine fall fungi.  Still way behind on identification but I thought I’d post a few more pictures, just to show off some of the variety and beauty of this often overlooked bit of biota.

Can you identify any of these?  The earthstar (my first one) should be easy enough… how about the others?

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-15

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-11

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-132

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-141

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-34

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-27

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-64

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-123

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-84

ojibway mushrooms fall 2011-100

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More mushroom madness in New Brunswick

23 Sep

Andrea and I found such a riot of mushrooms while tromping through the woods at her cottage that I may be posting about them till spring!  I spent some time tonight trying to identify a few more of the many mushrooms we photographed.  Surprisingly, some of the hardest to identify are some of the most distinctive.  Do you have any idea how many little orange mushrooms there are out there?

Here is my latest stab at identifications:

poss KING BOLETE - BOLETUS EDULIS

KING BOLETE – BOLETUS EDULIS

poss KING BOLETE - BOLETUS EDULIS 3

I’m not completely sure of this one, but if it is the king, it is supposed to be yummy. 


YELLOW PATCHES - AMANITA FLAVOCONIA

YELLOW PATCHES – AMANITA FLAVOCONIA

YELLOW PATCHES - AMANITA FLAVOCONIA -side


ORANGE GILL WAXYCAP - HYGROCYBE MARGINATA

ORANGE GILL WAXYCAP – HYGROCYBE MARGINATA

ORANGE GILL WAXYCAP - HYGROCYBE MARGINATA 2


DEAD MANS FINGERS - XYLARIA POLYMORPHA

DEAD MANS FINGERS – XYLARIA POLYMORPHA

Don’t you just love some of the common names?


TURKEY TAIL - TRAMETES VERSICOLOR 2


LACTARIUS PIPERATUS

LACTARIUS PIPERATUS

LACTARIUS PIPERATUS 2


poss RAMARIOPSIS LAETICOLOR

RAMARIOPSIS LAETICOLOR

poss RAMARIOPSIS LAETICOLOR (2)

I have found that once you get interested in hunting and identifying something in nature, be it mushrooms or trees or wildflowers, you begin to see things that you never noticed before.  A whole new world opens up and your senses become heightened.  A simple walk through the woods becomes much more interesting and even exciting – when you find something new and different.

I have lots more mushrooms from New Brunswick, but I’ll save them for another post.

Our cottage naturalist library

20 Sep

I have bought a bunch of books to update our library of natural sciences and field guides for the cottage.  We have quite a selection already, but many are quite old and not as rich in photos and color plates as the newer ones. 

P1050538I hope that some of you cottage naturalists will use them.  Take an afternoon and challenge yourself to identify 5 trees that you don’t know the name of, or pick a bouquet of flowers and pull out the wildflower book to see what you’ve got.  It can be addictive.  As you know, I’m addicted to mushrooms right now – but I don’t have a good mushroom book so I perused our naturalist library in the shelves above the couch and came up with not one but 5 different books to satisfy my quest for identification!P1050539

Once you get into a bit of plant or animal or rock or insect identification you’ll be hooked!

Who’s poop is this?

19 Sep

Another instalment of the ever popular “poop post”.  Here is a photo of some poop found within yards of the edge of the beaver pond.  Can you guess what animal might have left it there?

cottage fall 2011 -115

Mushrooms at Andrea’s cottage

31 Aug

In a moist, loamy corner of New Brunswick, Andrea and Ugo’s cottage is perched on stilts, overlooking a stony, sandy beach. On a misty afternoon, Andrea and I took “the pack” on an adventure walk through the forest surrounding the cottage. As we walked on the soft bedding of the regenerating decay of the forest floor, I noticed a wide range of mushrooms. Here is a small sampling…actually it is as many as I have been able to identify to date. I am probably wrong on my identification of a few…more to come.

20110831-082926.jpg

Cloudy clitocybe

 

20110831-082953.jpg

False chanterelle

 

 

 

20110831-083046.jpg

Violet branched coral mushroom

20110831-083110.jpg

Crown tipped coral mushroom

20110831-083209.jpg

Emetic russula

 

20110831-083300.jpg

Variegated mop

September 16 – The Mighty Naturalist ain’t so smart

29 Sep

Being an armchair naturalist actually takes some work and study – the more you learn, the more need to learn.  I am now in the position of knowing how much I don’t know.  I assumed that since they were all so distinctive, mosses, mushrooms , lichens and fungus would be easy-peasy to identify.  Ho-ho-ho – apparently nothing is easy in the world of identification.  After a session with mum and I both looking through a foot-high stack of nature guides on plants, mushrooms, wetland plants, amphibians and others, we managed to identify the grey frog and brown cockroach (see previous post) as well as the following;

cortinarius cinnamomeus for blog 

polyporus versacolor for blogfalse pixie cup for blog

I really love the false pixie cup – here is a closer look at some.  It is a bit dryer that the selection above so it looks slightly different – fascinating though…no?

P1030513

Not much identified – at this rate I’ll have to work all winter on this!